Leveraging Cultural Relevance for Branding Success

This is the extended version of the domain review for rarer.xyz, the opening section has been taken from the domain review. You can read the compact version here.

When it comes down to it, scarcity is the driver of commerce. And, indeed, defines our concept of this intangible construction as humans we have agreed to call (economic) ‘wealth’ or ‘riches’. The driving fundamentals of NFTs can be considered a hyperized version of this concept of scarcity; the idea of a given object or experience not being freely available. The feeling that what you have access to is rarer than

It is within these crosswinds of growth that the brand Rarer.xyz sits. Short, impactful and targeted, there is a kind of cosmic unity to the word ‘Rarer’. Perhaps it is because the construction of the word itself is rarer than nearly all other English dictionary words, containing a seldom-seen pattern of the same consonant (C) repeated three times and broken up twice by a (long) vowel (V). That is, a CVCVC constuction — in an ABACA pattern.

Rarer for the Chinese market

And it is this ephemeral charm that means Rarer.xyz works as a symbol on multiple levels, while appealing to markets across multiple world regions.

For example, compared to the typical native English speaker, Mandarin speakers may tend to be more used to recognizing patterns in words, and attributing them the appropariate weight. This may be at least partially because of the closer representational link between word as symbol and its meaning in Mandarin Chinese.

But it is more likely due to the importance of numerology and patterns of growth in East Asian culture. With worldview origin and way of engaging that views the world as as an organism, built on powerful patterns of life.

Seen through this lens, the letter that make up the word ‘rarer’ reflect a pretty rare pattern, it has three consonants that are all the same, broken up by two long vowels. Or, it run in the pattern ABACA.

If you’ve ever dealt with Chinese domain investors, you will already know how sought after such domains are. For those who are interested, this is also the first section of the ABACABA recursive fractal pattern – the so-called ‘code of life’.

A top brand finds taps into deep-seated associations, invoking its position as a brand the user can relate to and trust. 

Even rarer for the MENA market?

It would also appear that ‘rarer’ ticks a similar box for speakers of Semitic languages (Hebrew, Arabic, Amharic, etc.). In languages stemming from the Semitic branch, the root of a word can often be broken down into a kind of core grid structure. And the accompanying non-core letters switched out to form a related word.

For example, if they knew the way English grammar works even an outsider to the language could likely identify that the words engrave (verb), engraving (noun), and engraved (adjective) are all words for related things. Because they can see the common engrav- root.

But in Semitic languages, this common root comes not in the forms of one single block of letter but rather a core grid of letters (typically consonants) that can be identified by the speaker.

For example, where A is the root letters and all other letters are the alteration, a noun may look like ABABA, with related verbs or adjectives looking like ACADAE or AFAGAHI — or really a large number of possible combinations. These multiple variations will all be different words that roam widely in their expression, but nevertheless retain the A_A_A core structure — as the identifiable root of that pool of words.

The cultural relevance of great brands

The linguistics is of course more complicated than we cn cover here — and in Semitic lanaguages there’s also a further pattern layer in play. But the point for the discussion at hand is the potential implications for the “inherent brand equity” of those domains that can tap into deep-rooted, unique flows of consciousness and being.
That is, the (often subconscious) ‘weight’ that a brand carries with users in a given market.

Although highly intangible and culturally specific, a top brand finds a way to tap into deep-seated associations, invoking its position as a brand the user can relate to an trust. Using any kind of cultural relevance available to do so.

So it is then that RaReR may well stand a higher chance of subconsciously clicking with speakers of Semitic languages, and those who speak Mandarin.

This word also has a very, erm, seldom-seen structure in English!
We still have the popX Language S.W.O.T. Team on the case, crunching up the final number of accepted dictionary words built on this rare letter pattern. But we can already say that, statistically, the construction of the word ‘rarer’ has, well, shall we say, a data-verifiable case for being a pretty unique linguistic offering in the grand scheme of things.


Are you a speaker of any of the languages groups mentioned in this blog post? Get in touch — blog@popX.io!
We plan on revisiting this letter ‘sequencing’ theme again, so we’d love to hear any input from you! Whether in the branding/domain context or otherwise!

Orby.co

This is the extended version of the domain review for rarer.xyz.

Learn about the cultural relevance at the heart of many major world langauges. And how this can be used to craft a brand that is built on a deep resonance with the target audience.

CryptoMicrofinance.com

This is the extended version of the domain review for rarer.xyz.

Learn about the cultural relevance at the heart of many major world langauges. And how this can be used to craft a brand that is built on a deep resonance with the target audience.